AUTHORITIES JAMMED MOSCOW’S MOBILE INTERNET DURING OPPOSITION PROTESTS – NGO | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

AUTHORITIES JAMMED MOSCOW’S MOBILE INTERNET DURING OPPOSITION PROTESTS – NGO

SOURCE: THEMOSCOWTIMES.COM
Russian authorities ordered mobile operators to cut access to mobile data services during last weekend's opposition protests in Moscow, marking the first documented case in Moscow's history, Russia’s Internet Protection Society NGO has said.

Russia's first documented instance of authorities ordering to stifle mobile internet access took place in the country's republic of Ingushetia in October, when thousands gathered against a border deal with neighboring Chechnya. Last Saturday, 1,001 people were detained along Moscow’s central Boulevard Ring during marches in support of opposition candidates rejected from running for city council.

Mobile internet access was restricted in an area of 13 square kilometers in Russia’s capital between 1 p.m. and 7 p.m. on Aug. 3, the Internet Protection Society said Monday.

The NetBlocks internet monitoring group documented a “targeted internet shutdown” in central Moscow at the time, including partial disruptions at the state-controlled provider Rostelecom.

Protesters and journalists, including a Moscow Times reporter, reported having difficulties connecting to the internet along the demonstration route that day.

Signals were shut down “at the demand of law enforcement agencies,” BBC Russia cited a call center letter it had obtained from one of Russia’s three major mobile operators as saying.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

And the US government has never, ever done anything like this, right?!?

And there are no plans to do this here in the US by the US government, right?!? I would like to submit the following article, dated 2013, as a reasonable explanation for what might happen, courtesy of the US government, if it ever feels that it is about to go through a severe lack of public trust, or dealing with a "false flag" which does not go as expected:

The Government’s Secret Plan to Shut Off Cellphones and the Internet, Explained

The article goes on to state:

'The Government’s Secret Plan to Shut Off Cellphones and the Internet, Explained
November 27, 2013
by Dana Liebelson
submit to redditShare304
This post first appeared at Mother Jones.

Update: The Electronic Privacy Information Center reports that the court just granted the government more time to decide whether to release the kill switch plan. It now has until January 13.

Shutterstock.com

This month, the United States District Court for the District of Columbia ruled that the Department of Homeland Security must make its plan to shut off the Internet and cellphone communications available to the American public. You, of course, may now be thinking: What plan?! Though President Barack Obama swiftly disapproved of ousted Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak turning off the Internet in his country (to quell widespread civil disobedience) in 2011, the US government has the authority to do the same sort of thing, under a plan that was devised during the George W. Bush administration. Many details of the government’s controversial “kill switch” authority have been classified, such as the conditions under which it can be implemented and how the switch can be used. But thanks to a Freedom of Information Act lawsuit filed by the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC), DHS has to reveal those details by December 12 — or mount an appeal. (The smart betting is on an appeal, since DHS has fought to release this information so far.) Yet here’s what we do know about the government’s “kill switch” plan:

What is a kill switch? A kill switch refers to the government’s authority to disconnect commercial and private wireless networks — affecting both cellphones and the Internet — in the event of an emergency, such as a viable threat of a terrorist attack.'

And just in case you have decided that you need not worry, because such legislation appears to have gone away, is the following story, dated 2018:

US government still has the kill switch option for the net, and cellular communications

Comments

SHARE THIS ARTICLE WITH YOUR SOCIAL MEDIA