CRITICISMS OF NEW SAT ADVERSITY SCORE CONTINUE TO MOUNT | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED


CRITICISMS OF NEW SAT ADVERSITY SCORE CONTINUE TO MOUNT

SOURCE: JENNIFER KABBANY VIA THE COLLEGE FIX
Authored by Jennifer Kabbany via The College Fix,

The recent decision by the Scholastic Aptitude Test to add a so-called adversity score to test takers’ results for college admissions’ officials to weigh has been almost universally panned.

Few think it’s a good idea to give students an “overall disadvantage level” ranking.

First, conservative scholar Heather Mac Donald laid out several big problems with the new index, noting it’s basically affirmative action and reinforces the soft bigotry of low expectations.

The College Fix’s senior reporter Christian Schneider also weighed in, calling it “just another invitation for fraud.”

“Clearly, lying about one’s racial identity is wrong – but in a country where racial makeup is growing more complex and college admittance is as competitive as ever, students can hardly be blamed for trying to give themselves a leg up,” he opined.

“Colleges are basically begging to be duped – this is akin to publishing your HBO NOW login credentials online and politely asking people not to use your password to watch ‘Game of Thrones.'

Webmaster's Commentary: 

I graduated from college with a 3.75 GPA; and I had a "learning disability" which was not even uncovered until Mike and I started dating.

He took me to a safety-approved gun range, and as someone who always thought of themselves to be right-handed, I couldn't hit the broad side of a barn , or the target, with my right hand.

Mike looked at me, smiling somewhat knowingly,and said: "Giggles and grins, honey, try doing this with your left hand; and I was able to hit the target much more toward the center, and indeed, in the center frequently; I was right handed, left-eye dominant, which is described as "mixed brain dominance", which is why, to this day - at 70 - I cannot, for the life of me, sightread a piano score, cold. (And yet, I am a published composer! :-)

I wish these kinds of things could be diagnosed, and treated very early in all of our childrens' educations; it would make their subsequent learning, far easier, and much more successful.

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