Former Rep. Joe Walsh applauds torture: Rectal feeding is ‘job description’ of an ‘American hero’ | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

Former Rep. Joe Walsh applauds torture: Rectal feeding is ‘job description’ of an ‘American hero’

Radio host and former Republican Rep. Joe Walsh suggested on Wednesday that anyone who participated in torture techniques like rectal forced feedings or chaining prisoners naked to the floor were “American heroes.”

Webmaster's Commentary: 

A short memo to Joe Walsh: sir, your amazingly studied lack of understanding of what the use of torture does to the perception of what this country is, both at home and abroad, is, to put it mildly, stunning.

When America either tortures prisoners of war, or outsources it to some third world thugs, the following happens.

1. People understand that, at the top levels of US government, those very values that used to put us in a unique place as a people and a country, those values including human rights, human dignity, and decency are simply discarded.

2. That there are some really emotionally twisted pieces of work at the highest levels of US government, who get off on doing/watching this kind of torture being done. I would suspect, sir, that you may well be one of those people.

Humankind has known, from the time of the Catholic Inquisition, that torture only gets the tortured individual to say what the torturer wants them to stay in order to get the torture to stop.

One of the master interrogators of World War II was the German Hans Scharff. Instead of using torture, he used what information he could gather from the POW's backgrounds. as reported at worldwarhistoryonline:

Hanns Scharff (left) always made sure he knew about the personal circumstances of prisoners of war before interrogating them Much of the debate about the interrogation of suspected terrorists has been about whether the methods used, such as waterboarding, could be described as torture. Historian Julian Putkowski examines how a German Luftwaffe interrogator used persuasion rather than punishment to get prisoners of war to talk. During the latter part of World War II lots of allied fliers got shot down over Germany. Many of the survivors - or terrorfliegers as they were termed by the Nazis - got rounded up and were dispatched to Luftwaffe's interrogation unit at Dulag Luft POW Camp, near Oberursel. After being marched into the camp, they were placed in solitary confinement and in spite of the provisions of the Geneva Convention, they anticipated rough handling, possibly having their fingernails torn off by Nazi torturers. Aircrew who anticipated a Gestapo-style battering were in for a surprise when they encountered Obergefreiter Hanns Scharff, who had acquired fluent English when working as a businessman in pre-war South Africa. Although his inscrutability secured him the nick-name Stone Face, he was otherwise a genial fellow. He was a self-taught interrogator who used persuasion rather than punishment as a strategy for getting Allied prisoners of war to disclose more than the customary name, rank and number, permitted by the Geneva Convention. Scharff always began by doing his homework thoroughly. Before commencing an interrogation session, he checked all available data, generally acquainting himself with whatever was known about the pilot's service and personal circumstances. The Scharff method, if so it may be called, relied on the initial premise that it was better for a flier to co-operate with the Luftwaffe, instead of being regarded as a spy and handed over to the Gestapo. Even though there were a few prisoners who remained button-lipped, Scharff resolutely refused to descend to using physical coercion. Instead of using pliers to squeeze information out of prisoners, Scharff got what he and his superiors wanted by playing on a prisoner's sense of isolation and psychological insecurity. Carefully deploying what were sometimes meagre scraps of data, Scharff sought to create the illusion of total knowledge about a prisoner's activities. Misled into believing that the interrogator knew just about everything anyway, the latter could then be bamboozled into disclosing military secrets. Scharff appeared to reverse the overtly adversarial relationship between interrogator and prisoner by adopting a subtle, softly-softly approach.

3. And Joe, I would like to strongly caution you on your mindless cheerleading of CIA torture: when the US tortures, it gives some bad guys who don't necessarily like us very much carte blanche to torture both American military members, and American civilians. Did that notion ever cross your mind?!?

Thought not

Remember: Hitler praised the Gestapo and the SS as "heroes".

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