Mistrial declared on murder counts for Libyan man accused in 2012 Benghazi attacks | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

Mistrial declared on murder counts for Libyan man accused in 2012 Benghazi attacks

A U.S. judge declared a mistrial Monday after a federal jury convicted a second Libyan man of conspiracy in the deadly 2012 attacks on U.S. facilities in Benghazi, Libya, but deadlocked on 15 of 17 counts in connection with the deaths of U.S. Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens and three other Americans.

U.S. District Judge Christopher "Casey" Cooper found jurors hung and dismissed them after they reported themselves unable "to come to unanimous agreement on any of the remaining counts" in a note sent at 11:27 a.m.

Cooper last Thursday asked jurors to return after a weekend break following their partial verdict, in which they found Mustafa al-Imam, 47, guilty on one count each of conspiracy to provide material support to terrorists and maliciously destroying government property in overnight attacks that began Sept. 11, 2012, on a U.S. diplomatic mission and nearby CIA post.

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