Spy Museum Uses Torture to Entice | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

Spy Museum Uses Torture to Entice

Mark Fallon, former investigator at Guantanamo, noticed an advertisement for the International Spy Museum in Washington.

The fact the ?@IntlSpyMuseum? would seek to profit from human suffering, with sidewalk ads about water #torture is shameful and irresponsible. ?@hrw? ?@P4HR? ?@HRFNatlSecurity? ?@hrfalerts? ?@cvt_staff? ?@amnestyusa? #HumanRights matter

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2:35 PM - Jun 2, 2019
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On a recent trip to the museum I picked up on many subtle–and not so subtle–messages to valorize the deeply problematic deeds of secret intelligence agencies.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

It is unfortunate that with the Senate having backed Gina Haspel as director of the CIA, means that this agency will probably still torture, or outsource torture, as a way of allegedly "gathering intelligence".

The problem is, that torture does does not work; because the dynamic of this process is, that the tortured person will say ANYTHING, no matter how flatly wrong, to get the torture to stop.
Among countries which still continue this barbaric practice, are:
Israel;Israel police abuse detained Palestinian children

Cameroon: Cameroon Routine torture, and held incommunicado detention

Iraq: Iraq tortures children from suspected Islamic State Ties

It is too damned bad that the leadership of this country, doesn't remember the lessons of a brilliant German interrogator during World War 2, Hanns Sharff. Wikipedia:
Hanns Scharff

FBI gets an unexpected lesson from a former interrogator for the Nazis

Between the two wars, he learned English brilliantly, and was interrogating English, and American POWs, but not one bit of brutality was ever used. His technique has to get the prisoner to think that he already knew everything about the operations in which they were involved. He even, on occasion, took them out with a "day pass" for a cultural or artistic event. He knew how to get people he interrogated feel at ease, and somehow, something popped out of their mouths which gave him more insight into what they were really doing.

He was so respected, that after the war, the American military invited him to teach their people how to do what he had done; he later moved here, and became a pottery artist.

It is unfortunate that the American military has forgotten this very decent man and his techniques; this man had to have had a very high moral character, NOT to do what his fellow interrogators were doing, in terms of not beating, strangling, or tearing out fingernails.

There's a film/documentary somewhere in this man's life; actor/director John Noble, white courtesy telephone, please!!! :-)

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